Review: The Rock That Is Higher: Story as Truth

The Rock That Is Higher: Story as Truth
The Rock That Is Higher: Story as Truth by Madeleine L’Engle
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Originally when I bought this book, I had gotten it thinking that this would be a book on the nature of story exploring elements of truth. Instead, it was more of a memoir, with L’Engle sharing personal stories interspered with her thoughts on Christianity, and how the nature of story binds both. Don’t get me wrong–I liked it, but I wanted something more scholarly, not reflective. So that’s the only reason I’m marking it 2 stars.

That said, as always, L’Engle’s writing speaks to me. I found her words intensely comforting, since I was going through a rough patch. It was good to get her take on things. I will confess though, towards the end, it felt like she was repeating herself, and I felt it didn’t bring anything new to my mind on the nature of story. The periods where I wouldn’t read the book got longer and longer. At this point, I’m going to mark it unfinished and put it back on the bookcase, since I have other books to read.

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21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus One) Eligible for 2014 Awards!

So I’m beginning to see people listing the works they’ve done for 2014 that are eligible for awards. My short story “21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus One)” , published in February 2014 by Strange Horizons, has been generating a lot of buzz, so I thought I get it out there. (and hey, I’m actually on time on making this type of announcement, too!)

You can both read and listen to it on the Strange Horizons website. Also, if you are a Drabblecast B-Side subscriber, you can listen to a reading there as well as view new art!

You may also want to check out my story “Sun-Touched” published by Kaleidotrope in March 2014. 

Thanks for reading!

ICON 39 / Paradise ICON 3 report (w/PICTURES!)

Via Tardis, no da.

So I’m back from ICON 39. It was wonderful and intense.

The intense portion was more due to the fact that I was taking part in Paradise ICON, a mini-workshop for neo-pro writers. Basically think Viable Paradise shrunk into two days. The first day we spent critiquing each others’ manuscripts; the second was spent being taught by the Guests of Honor, Elizabeth Bear and Scott Lynch (my instructors at VPXV) and Toastmaster Jim Hines, whom I met at Mo*Con. 

But really, I was there to learn how to be author.

The day before the con started, there was a Barnes and Noble signing that was sponsored by the con. I was asked to attend and to bring books to sign. This was something I’ve never really done before. The only books I’m in are anthologies. Normally, I’d get a reader’s copy along with my pay, but I never really thought to actually purchase more copies to sell at cons. I knew people who’ve done it though. If I did this, it would involve spending my own money to buy copies to sell. And I always had that adage beat into me: money always flow towards the writer.

But in this case, would it be profitable? Would it be worth it? 

I decided to do an experiement. I bought five copies from my publisher to take with me. I figured, at the worst, I’d sell one, maybe two copies. The rest I’d either give away or sell at other cons. At the end of the con, I sold not one, not two…but three. Yes, they were to people in my workshop, but still…three copies!

My first book event!

It was a good learning experience. Made me think, okay, maybe I can handle the book thing. Which means I need to finish it.

It was wonderful to hang with Bear, Scott and Jim, as well as make new friends. I really enjoyed meeting the Paradise Icon folk. They’re great writers, and hanging out with them was such a delight.

Because I was busy with Paradise Icon, I only saw a little of ICON itself. But I did see some great costumes:

I also met this wonderful lady, Felicity, who was selling hats she made in the dealer’s room. 

It’s becoming a tradition now that whenever I go to a con, I get a tiny hat. I was most delighted to purchase one from Fine Hats by Felicity . After purchasing it, I had gone to talk with some writer folks. We were standing outside another room which was being used for a wedding reception not related to the con. I felt a tap on my shoulder and turned to see two young black girls in waiter uniforms who were standing at the door of the reception, ushering people in. 

“Excuse me,” they said. “But we looooove your hat! Where did you get it?”

Grinning, I pointed to the dealers’ room.Their faces fell. “We’re on duty, so we can’t go in.”

“No prob,” I said. Went back to the dealer’s room, grabbed a few of Felicity’s business cards and gave them to the girls. “She sells the hats online. She has an Etsy shop. And…” I lowered my voice. “She’s black, too!”

Oh, you should have seen their faces light up. I wished I could’ve talked to them more about the con, but they had to go back on duty, but it was nice to see them geeking out over the hat.

So, all in all, it was a good time. I had lots of fun, and who knows, maybe at some point I’ll visit again, just so I can see Sailor Bacon.

If that’s not a sign of a fun con, I don’t know what is.

ICON 39 Schedule

This Thursday (that’s tomorrow), I’ll be heading over to Cedar Rapids, IA to attend ICON 39. Most of the time I’ll be attending Paradise ICON, the writer’s workshop portion of the con, but you’ll still be able to see me off and on throughout the con.

One of the things I’ll also be doing is attending the Barnes and Noble Book Signing Event Thursday evening, 6:30p to 8:30p, at the B&N located at (333 Collins Rd NE Bldg 1, Northland Square SC, Cedar Rapids, IA 52402). I will have copies of What Fates Impose anthology, edited by Nayad Monroe and which has my story “There are No Wrong Answers”.  

What Fates Impose

(BTW…did you know Nayad’s got a new anthology coming out? It’s called “Not Our Kind” and the Kickstarter for it is happening now. Check it out!)

Here’s the rest of my schedule for ICON:

Friday, 10/31

9am – 5pm Paradise ICON

After dinner I should be wandering around the con and/or hanging out at BarCon.

Saturday, 11/1

9am – 10am Paradise ICON

10 am – 12 pm Author Meet and Greet 

1 pm – 3 pm Paradise ICON
 
4pm – 7pm Free time
 
7pm – 9 pm, Rapid Fire Reading, Chestnut Room
 
9pm — Barcon!
 
Sunday, 11/2
Open
 
If you’re coming to ICON, if you can catch me, say hi!

LaShawn’s Writing Update October 2014 (Or how to find time writing with a full-time job and life exploding around you)

This has been a year of change. February, my status at work changed to full-time. It’s been ten years since I’ve been full-time at a job. March, my inlaws, who had been living with us for 3-1/2 years, moved to their own place. May, FrenkelFail happened. July, my gall bladder was removed because they found a gallstone.

It is now October, and I can almost say the dust as settled. I know there are a couple of other things that are coming down the pike, but I’ll wait until they appear before I mention it. Right now, I want to write about how my writing life adjusted (and trust me, it was a huge adjustment.)

I did a guest blog over at Sarah Hans’s website (and yeah, it’s been so busy, I’m just now getting around to mentioning it). In it, I mentioned that I started getting up at 5:30am to write. Yeah, that didn’t last long. Turns out, I’m really not a morning person. I was only able to do it for two weeks before deciding I really, really like getting my sleep in the mornings. And when I did try to write, I would write well for about 15 minutes or so, run out of steam, then sit there staring blankly for the rest of the hour or so, writing whenever something came to mind.

Come to think of it, that was how I wrote. Period.

A couple of years ago, I was chatting with Sarah Monette about her writing process. Her method was to leave a story project open on her computer and work on it in bits and pieces throughout the day. At the time, I thought it was a slow process. After all, there are many creatives who say to schedule at least an hour to work on a project. Writing in shorter increments won’t work because it takes you 15 minutes to warm up and get into your stride and then by the time you are all warmed up, stopping kills the flow.

But…as I thought about it…that’s how I was if I was working with a time crunch deadline. When I don’t have that, or if I’m brainstorming, or revising?  It doesn’t take an hour and a half. Before, I would sit at my desk for an hour, slowly going through the text line by line. If I wrote in shorter time chunks, how would that work? How could I arrange things so I could write in shorter bursts? What I needed was more than just adjusting to writing in a shorter time period. I needed to change my entire writing process.

In a sense, it’s like going back to basics with Barbara DeMarco’s book: “Pen on Fire: A Busy Woman’s Guide to Igniting the Writer Within“. In it, she suggested to set aside 15 minutes to work on writing. I can find at least 15 minutes during the day. Can I write during my morning break at work? In 15 minutes, I sure can. What about lunch? 15 minutes there? Afternoon break? 15 minutes At home? another 15 minutes. Hey, that’s an hour right there.

Now that I’m writing now at odd times, I needed something that I could have accessible at any moment, at any time, where I could jot down thoughts and lines and words as they came to me throughout the day. Something so accessible, I could use it even when I didn’t have access to internet. Get ready, because this will blow your mind.
 
 
 
Ordinary pen and paper. Who’d thunk, RIGHT?
 
Having a physical notebook means that I can write anywhere, anytime. Which, if I’m brainstorming or jotting notes or playing with sentences, it’s awesome. I can be thinking about my work, honing it in my head, then jot a few phrases down. Get enough of those, and I got me a working draft.
 
Revisions are a little trickier. It’s easier for me to edit drafts on the computer, therefore I needed a way to do it so I can access those drafts anytime, anywhere. This meant changing the place where I stored my work from my local computer to the cloud. Currently I’m using Dropbox, and it’s nice. I still back up to local though, because backups are good.
 
This also meant I could no longer bounce between three programs: Writer’s Cafe, Word and Scrivener. I had to stick with something that could contain all my work and notes and word processing in one place, that I could access from anywhere. 
 
I loved Writer’s Cafe. I really, really did. I even wrote a blog post comparing the two programs, saying I couldn’t give up Writer’s Cafe even though Scrivener was the better choice. Well, that changed this summer. Scrivener was overwhelmingly better in keeping all my notes, drafts, storyboards, annotations and working drafts in one spot. And as I used Scrivener, I began to discover new ways to keep my writing on track: utilizing the outliner, working with meta-data. You know the best feature I’m loving right now? Color-coding the annotations in my drafts to show what needed to be done in the texts. A sort of to-do list, if you will. Parts I need to brainstorm are in blue, sentence rewrites in white, facts to research in orange–even if I’m not actively writing, I can open Scrivener, choose a color, and work on those in bits and pieces throughout the day. Then, when I’m done, I delete the note. It’s nice to see all those notes and comments vanish as the story firms up.
 
Sorry, Writer’s Cafe, but from now on, I’ll have to go with Scrivener.
 
So that was my summer–figuring out Scrivener and the new writing process. Write in bits and pieces, get them into Scrivener. Expand. Set myself a limit of 500 words. (Oh, yes! Scrivener is awesome for setting daily writing goals). Work on the text in bits and pieces. And, if needed, use a couple of vacation days as writing retreat days, go to a coffee house and write like mad all day.
 
All of this to say, October 1, I finished the first draft of a new 6000 word story. I didn’t think I would have time to do that, and I’m quite pleased with it. I’ve also been working on Willow (because oh gosh, that never ends), and now that I have everything in Scrivener, I find working on it much MUCH easier. 
 
I may have lost time with the expansion of the day job, but nowadays, I’ve been feeling way more productive than the past three 1/2 years. We’ll see how things go.
 

Review: The Qualities of Wood

The Qualities of Wood
The Qualities of Wood by Mary Vensel White
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

I got this thinking it was a literary novel. It tries to be, but it wants to be more a mystery novel. It doesn’t do so well on that either. The “secrets” that are hinted at don’t amount to much. There were some good secrets that could’ve been worth chasing: why doesn’t the town acknowledge its Indian heritage? What was up with the gun? Why, indeed, was Chanelle’s arms at her sides when she died? There were so many secrets and ‘mysteries’, but the it was as if the author was afraid to poke deeper at the many plot ideas she had, so she threw a whole bunch in together. It made for a book where we look at things from a distance, but not really getting to the meat of things.

Minute details bogged the story down to a crawl. The author had to describe every little action that had no bearing on the plot whatsover. I found myself flipping pages more than reading them.

The only time the book came alive was during Nowell and Lonnie’s arguments. In fact, probably the most fleshed out character was Lonnie, mainly because he was the main person to actually rile up the characters. Vivian through the plot in a clueless daze, or through dull flashbacks most of the time, and when she did do something proactive, usually when drunk, her actions made little sense. Katherine ‘clackety bracelet’ demeanor irritated me to the point I was skipping most of the scenes she was in. Nowell whined about his book and mainly hid a lot. Mr. Stokes was set up as a ‘mysterious stranger’, but even he felt distanced. Most of what we learn of him is through hearsay. Vivian’s interactions with him felt too timid.

I guess I was hoping the book would live up to its title, which I’m still trying to figure out why it’s named “The Qualities of Wood.” I wanted more, which I got through mundane detail, but not enough to satisfy or care about the resolving of secrets.

View all my reviews

A brief note of thanks

There’s been a lot happening with Wiscon the past few weeks. I won’t go into it–there are other places you can read up on it– but this week the Wiscon Concom released this statement that Jim Frenkel is permanently banned from Wiscon.

I’m not going to go into the ban itself other than to say it was sorely needed–again, others did a better job of it of explaining why. Also I’m local, so I feel I’m too close to things to share my opinions in public. I’m also a relative newcomer to the con scene, so I don’t think anything I say about Wiscon will have much impact. But there is one thing I do want to say:

In the past few weeks I saw a lot of expressed anger and hurt feelings. I saw turmoil and disappointment. I saw several people step down from the concomm. I also saw a lot of people who said they were angry, but they weren’t going to give up on Wiscon. They were going to work to make things right.

These are the people I want to give their due. Because they worked hard, and they’re still working hard as I write this. And it’s not just local people. It’s people all over the country, people who could’ve just as easily boycotted Wiscon…

(…although this was probably the first time I saw the use of boycotting actually affect change. I’m so used to hearing people decry, “I’ll boycott X or I’ll boycott Y” and for the most part, everyone is like ‘meh’. Many of the people I spoke to who announced they were boycotting Wiscon wasn’t doing it out of spite. They were genuinely concerned for the con and the safety of its attendees. And that helped spur the change within Wiscon itself.)

An institution is only as good as the people that make it up. The Wiscon concom is not perfect, as so many of you pointed out. But they are working on it. And because Wiscon is my home con this is one of the few cons I can go to, the fact that there are people here who are willing to humble themselves, say they’re sorry, then work on change, makes me appreciate them. Deeply.

So thank you, Wiscon, for doing the right thing.

(8/7 Edited to add Skepchick’s wonderful post: Your Well-Written Anti-Harassment Policy is Insufficient)

 

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